How To Reduce The Risk Of Muscle Injury By Keeping Hydrated – Pro Tips For Runners – Paul Gough Physio Rooms

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How To Reduce The Risk Of Muscle Injury By Keeping Hydrated – Pro Tips For Runners

It’s getting HOT!…

And if you’re involved in any kind of activity or sporting competition over the weekend, then it might help you to know one or two things about how to do it safely.

Keeping hydrated is the number thing (and most easy) thing that any one can do to limit the chances you’ll get injured or burn out too early.

Frequent drinks breaks – where the game is actually stopped and the players are allowed to regroup and top up on their fluids is something that is vital this weekend.

With that in mind, here are some timely “tips” on taking on board the right fluids at the right time, over these next few warmer weeks:

First up, it’s essential that you don’t wait until you are thirsty to begin to drink fluids. Because by then, it’s too late and you are already dehydrated. Fact: A 2% drop in bodily fluids will reduce your ability to perform by somewhere close to 20%.

Water is the obvious and cheapest way to hydrate. However, it’s important for you to understand when and how to consume it – in small but regular quantities throughout the week.

Don’t wake up on the day or your game and start doing it them – it can quickly bloat your stomach, reducing the amount of fluid you can consume.

It is also likely to make you need the toilet regularly. Plus, it doesn’t do much to give you energy. You’ll only find that in isotonic drinks.

Energy is important in the one hour prior, during and immediately after competition. To achieve this I recommend non-fizzy Isotonic sports drinks.

My advice is simple and is this:

This summer, consume water little and often through the week (8-10 glasses per day) and isotonic drinks (immediately before, during and after competition) to help improve your energy and lessen the time it takes to recover. When it comes to caffeine, it’s a “no-no”. Avoid energy drinks, coffee and tea completely. Non of them are going to help you like you hope.

And here’s something else to consider – it’s not just from fluids that better hydration happens. It’s also found in the foods you eat:

Virtually all food contains water, with natural, whole foods such as fruit and vegetables having high water content. Here are my top tips for foods you should consider to help with your hydration levels:

  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Strawberries
  • Coconut

These foods alone are not enough to hydrate your body, however if you add these to your diet and you drink water little and often through the week, along with energy drinks around the time of competition, you’ll be doing everything that the pro-players will be doing to increase their chances of success as they prepare in preseason.

Written By Physio Paul Gough, Published in the Northern Echo Newspaper.

For more sport injury tips like this, please he’d over to this page now: www.paulgoughphysio.com/sports-injury-clinic to pick up a free tips report on ways to recover faster from injury. sports injury clinic

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